Kara Wild has been released!

From Free Kara Wild

After 17 months incarcerated in isolation in a foreign men’s prison, Kara had her trial in late September. Today, on November 14th, she was released from prison! Kara and her support team would like to give a MASSIVE thanks to everyone who wrote to Kara, donated to her legal/commissary fund, and made the hellish existence of prison without a set release date a little more bearable. Kara needs our financial support to reintegrate into world outside of the prison walls.

DONATE TO HER FREEDOM FUND HERE

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Support Parole for Herman Bell

From Free Herman Bell

Herman Bell has been to the New York state parole board 7 times and been denied 7 times. His next parole board appearance will be in February 2018, when he will be 70 years old. At this next appearance, we hope that Herman will have a better chance of being seriously considered and therefore released. New regulations governing parole hearings mandate that an applicant’s risk of recidivism be considered as a “guiding principle” of the hearing. Herman has the very lowest risk score, based on the Department of Corrections and Community Supervision’s measures. In addition, six new parole commissioners were added to the Board and several, though not all, of the older, law-enforcement connected ones have been retired. The new commissioners are mostly from social service and reentry backgrounds. Personal letters of recommendation and community support can play an important role in Herman’s next hearing.

On September 5th, Herman was brutally assaulted by a group of correctional officers at Great Meadow Correctional Facility. As is most often the case in these incidents, Herman was initially charged with assault on a guard. In fact, Herman had done nothing to provoke this attack – and, furthermore, showed restraint, non-violence, and discipline in the face of brutality.  In 95% of the cases in New York where a prisoner is charged with assaulting a guard, the prisoner is convicted and sentenced to box (Security Housing Unit) time.  However, the charges against Herman were dropped within a few weeks, as letters of support poured in from all over the world.  This is a stark reminder that, while Herman poses no danger to society, his continued imprisonment as an elder subjects him to extreme danger. He needs to come home.

How you can help: Continue reading

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Update on Jeremy Hammond

From Free Jeremy

After a long and stressful week, we are very happy to report that Jeremy has arrived at his new prison – FCI Milan in Milan, Michigan!

As you may have heard, Jeremy requested this relocation so he could participate in “RDAP” – or, the Residential Drug Abuse Program. RDAP is an intensive, nine-month long program offered to federal inmates who have a documented history of drug use prior to their arrest. Since Jeremy was an admitted marijuana smoker, he applied and was accepted into the program.

While the program is intensive, and Jeremy has described it as “hard time”, this will, in the end, be a positive step for Jeremy, as he will be eligible to receive up to twelve months off his sentence upon successful completion of the program.

As always, Jeremy loves to receive mail, and you can write to him at his new address:

Jeremy Hammond, #18729-424
FCI Milan
P.O. Box 1000
Milan, MI 48160

Another exciting development with this move is that the rules for sending Jeremy books has changed! Paperback books (and zines) no longer have to come directly from a publisher or distributor – they can now come directly from private citizens. Please note this applies to paperback books only. Hardcover books must still come directly from a publisher or distributor, like Amazon or AK Press. This means that if you have old paperbacks on your shelves that you think Jeremy would like, you can mail them directly to him! Please, if you choose to send books directly to Jeremy, do not include anything other than books (no more than 3 per package) and a letter in your package. Jeremy still cannot receive any items other than paperback books, zines, letters, articles, or photos through the mail. Please see this page for complete information about writing or sending books to Jeremy.

Please also be aware that, with participation in RDAP, the amount of free time that Jeremy has to do things like write back to people may change. Please be patient if you do not hear back from him, and remember that even if he doesn’t write back, he reads and deeply appreciates every letter that is sent to him. Please also remember that donations are still needed to ensure that Jeremy has the necessary funds to email, call, and write to friends, supporters, and loved one.

Thank you for all the solidarity shown to Jeremy over the years. We are so excited that Jeremy is finally making progress towards release, and, without a doubt, this progress could not have been made without the support of those of you who have written, sent books, donated, or spread awareness about Jeremy and his case. Thank you so much!

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Ongoing Work Strike at Holman Prison

From Anarchy Live!

On the evening of Friday, October 3, 2017 prisoners at Holman prison in Alabama began a work strike in protest to the suspension of weekend family visitation, the continued and ongoing of harassment by Alabama Department of Corrections CERT (riot squad) against prisoners, including physical assaults on prisoners, arbitrary shakedowns and the total disrespect CERT members show towards prisoners.

The CERT has been assigned to Holman October of 2016 after rebellious prisoners staged a number of work strikes, riots and the stabbings of warden Carter Davenport corrections officer Tait and the killing of corrections officer Bettis.

The work strike length is indefinite. Pass the word on and express your solidarity with the prison rebels held captive at Holman by demonstrating and direct action.

Michael Kimble
Holman Prison

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Hunger Strike: Statement from Walter Bond

Statement from Walter Bond recorded by the North American Animal Liberation Press Office on 11/15/17

(Audio Message)

Since my arrival in Greenville two-and-a-half years ago, my communications with the world have been made incredibly difficult and at times impossible. I have been repeatedly denied books, magazines, letters and pictures. It’s standard operating procedure that my mail – be it my email or snail mail — is habitually days, weeks and even months late. It is not at all uncommon for my mail, both incoming and outgoing, to simply never arrive.”

I’ve been…. I’ve even been denied copies of my own book, “Always Looking Forward,” which I wrote in prison and is approved for me to have.

It has also become impossible for me to adhere to my Vegan diet, because none of the so-called “meat options” offered at Greenville, Illinois are even close to Vegan. Because of this, I have been forced at great cost to my friends, family and supporters to pay outrageously for foods from the commissary that continue to be an inadequate version….

I have tried now for over a year to obtain a transfer from FCI Greenville, Illinois closer to New York City where I intend to live upon my release, but I have been denied this as well through petty and irrelevant disciplinary reports.

Despite all of this, I have maintained years of patience, quietly awaiting my freedom. But, my cooperation has got me nothing. So in the tradition of A.L.F. activists before me, such as Barry Horne, I am going on hunger strike. I will not eat anything and will starve until these issues are remedied.

I’m asking everybody in the Animal Rights and Anarchist communities to stand with me with your protests and actions of solidarity.

You can reach the institution concerning my health and my well-being at:
(618) 664-6200

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Support Wabash Valley Prisoners on Hunger Strike!

From IDOC Watch

Several inmates at Wabash Valley Correctional Facility have announced that they have begun a hunger strike to protest their deteriorating conditions. Their immediate demands include: removal from camera monitored cells, relocation from abusive staff, and the cessation of tampering with food and the confiscation, reading and withholding of mail by administration. The announcement follows a sequence of escalating problems that have unfolded in the prison for the past several months, rekindling a too-long dormant culture of resistance to IDOC policies. Last year, a significant challenge to the censorship of Afro-Centric literature such as the San Francisco Bay View, which effects all prisons in the Indiana Department of Corrections, began a process of increasing clampdown on political prisoners. This was merely the spark which lit the fire. The hunger strike now in motion has its origins in the entire structure of the IDOC, in particular, and of mass incarceration, in general.

For some time, the IDOC has pursued a path of repression characterized by the isolation of inmates whom it perceives as threatening to the stability of their regime of oppression. These inmates are often kept in Indiana’s form of solitary confinement known as “Secure Control Units.” Wabash Valley has taken this practice, widely recognized to be a form of torture, to new extremes by indefinitely detaining inmates in isolation cells monitored 24 hours a day through video surveillance. Shaka Shakur, a political prisoner currently incarcerated at Wabash Valley, has demonstrated how these cells are intended to function as psychological torture, and the policies which are supposed to govern their use are flagrantly violated by administration.

The selective treatment of politically conscious inmates is not limited to isolation and surveillance, however. Prisons in Indiana have developed a parallel judicial system in which the civil protections available to free citizens are completely absent. Inmates are consistently penalized and charged with internal violations which can result in their placement in isolation or loss of “good time” which by Indiana Code cannot be regained. In these faux-courts, prisoners are deprived of any right to representation or possibility of viewing the “evidence” used against them. Charges are often brought as a form of reprisal, beginning with disciplinary reports filed by disgruntled or sadistic guards looking to punish inmates for refusing passive obedience to their oppression.

The increasingly severe forms of repression manifest on all levels of the IDOC and affect all inmates as well. Several trends have coalesced and finally culminated in an irreconcilable crisis. The current landscape of the IDOC is the result of these trends, primarily the entrenchment at the tops levels of executive administration of old-guard prison staff experienced in the ways of prisoner abuse, the construction of prison facilities in rural, economically depleted areas which produces a situation that pits the solidarity of largely euro/ “white” communities against predominately non-euro/ “white” prisoners, and finally the privatization of all aspects of prison operation and management. These trends mutual influence and extend one another, creating an increasingly antagonistic atmosphere, resolvable only through the initiative of prisoners in taking all measures to reassert their humanity.

The current crisis can be explained only by observing these facts. For example, guards in the Security Control Unit at Wabash Valley leverage their familial and professional ties to maintain impunity while threatening and intimidating inmates under their “protection.” The former commander of the SCU, Lt. Gary McMillin, consistently stated that he would “stand by” his guards whenever they filed disciplinary reports. Reports are supposed to be reviewed once filed and approved by the Lieutenant before any action can be taken against an inmate. In this case, those reviews were performed by Mr. McMillin’s wife, Mrs. S. McMillin. Her “reviews” tend to result in conviction rates that would make any prosecutor blush. The result of this circle of corruption? More good time lost, more years spent inside, more money to J-Pay, Union Supply, Aramark, and Global Tel-Link.

On the state level, the IDOC just this month “reviewed” its new mail restriction policies. As many know by now, inmates can no longer send or receive correspondence unless it is written on lined, white paper in a white envelope. The IDOC claimed this was to counter drug trafficking, but has provided zero data on the flow of drugs into the facility coming through mail. Ironically, the only confirmed source of trafficking in the recent past is that conducted by a former corrections officer at Wabash Valley. There are no indications that the mail ban will be overturned, and more inmates and their families are forced to go through J-pay for all correspondence and increasingly, visitations.

The current crisis is the latest iteration of the fundamentally racist and increasingly corporatist exploitation at work in the IDOC. The kinds of oppression outlined here are well-documented as ineradicable aspects of mass incarceration in Indiana. Indeed the condition in Indiana prisons was meticulously outlined in the 1997 Human Rights Watch Report, Cold Storage: Super-Maximum Security Confinement in Indiana. Since that time, conditions have only worsened. Now inmates are fighting back. Their selfless struggle deserves the widest possible, most dedicated support. IDOC watch firmly stands with Shaka Shakur and all the hunger strikers. We demand that their demands are met, and further that an independent investigation be permitted to inspect the facility. Those will be the first steps, and very far from the last, in a long march toward eradicating the unjust, racist prison system in Indiana and, one day, the united states.

Information on Wabash Valley and the case of Shaka Shakur can be found on our blog at idocwatch.org

Please call: Warden Richard Brown (812) 398-5050

IDOC Commissioner Robert Carter (317) 232-5711

IDOC Chief of Staff Randy Koester (317) 232-5711

Demand that the inmates on hunger strike be moved from abusive guards and camera-monitored cells, and that their mail and food be secured from tampering.

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Support Cleve Cunningham

In September 2016, prisoners all over the United States rose up to demand an end to prison slavery and of prison itself. One of the epicenters of this wave of revolt was Holman prison in Alabama, where in throughout the year prisoners took over dorms, rioted, stabbed a warden and correctional officer, and engaged in other informal forms of resistance.

On September 1, 2016, a correctional officer was stabbed in the dining hall at Holman prison. He later died from the injuries. Cleve Cunningham allegedly stabbed the CO when he refused to provide Cleve with an extra tray of food. In response, COs attacked Cleve, severely injuring his leg. He was then transferred to Limestone Correctional Facility awaiting trial for the alleged murder.

As the prison strike begins to fade in people’s memories, we should remember that many of those who engaged in collective and individual resistance during the strike continue to face retaliation and legal charges. We should continue to act in solidarity with those who took risks to further the fight against prison society, bringing to life relationships that can transcend the walls that separate us.

Please consider sending Cleve a letter, card, zine, photo, drawing, or whatever else. He is particularly interested in reading about the Black Panther Party.

CLEVE IS STILL AWAITING TRIAL, SO PLEASE DO NOT ASK ABOUT THE INCIDENT HE IS BEING ACCUSED OF.

Write to Cleve:
Cleve Cunningham III
#288500
Limestone Correctional Facility
28779 Nick Davis Rd
Harvest, AL 35749

First time writing to a prisoner? Click here for some tips!

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Interview with Walter Bond

Check out this new interview with Animal Liberation Front Lone Wolf Walter Bond.

Walter discusses intersectionality, direct action, veganism, moving away from Islam and toward atheism, and his identification with insurrectionary and black anarchy.

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Statement from Michael Kimble for Bloomington Running Down the Walls

From Anarchy Live!

I just want everyone to know that i and a few others will be running on October 1st. i don’t know if we will run the entire 5k, but if not, we’ll walk the rest.

This will be my first time participating and i’m excited to be acting in sync with comrades all over the u.s., in and out of the prisons, to show my solidarity for political prisoners.

This is really cool and promotes healthy and cooperative attitudes and action.

Free All Political Prisoners!

Free Marius Mason!

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Looking Back: Three Years Since Eric’s Arrest

Photo taken 09/16/2014

A poem written by Eric

I was arrested by two ugly shades,
holding two ugly guns
pointed directly at my face
wearing a backpack full of gasoline and paint thinner

One to create, one to tear down
pockets full of shells and notes to remember
my tshirt was solid black
my jeans hadn’t been washed in weeks

Calvin was patted and released
he had to work for me that night
the cops of me of the beatings and sexual assault
that I had to look forward to that evening in holding
while handcuffed to a bench
stayed there for 3 days
ate 1 cinnamon bun

Was wearing the red pumas with the white laces
that Andrea had given me for surviving to be 25
achievements of all sizes

I was arrested on September 16th, 3 years ago
although it always feels
much longer ago

the interrogator was
fuming after my laughing
subsided
after they asked if “was
this an occupy plot?!”

They had a warrant for my
body
A warrant for my spit

My mom cried on the
phone ” your family saw
you all over the news!
And they used a terrible picture!”

 

Eric has been locked up for three years now, he was arrested on September 16th 2014. Between Kansas, Oklahoma, and now Colorado he has seen a lot of different jails and prisons and has had his share of struggles along the way. There’s no denying it has been a long road and unfortunately there’s an even longer road ahead. Continue reading

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